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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay I just got my three-pod "A-Pillar" and I'm itchin to throw something in it. On every other car I would say that the first two gauges that are must have would be Oil Temperature and Oil Pressure. On a standard car I always have appreciated a nice volt-meter, however with a Turbo car I'm guessing that EGT/CHT would be nice (with tuning perhaps wideband A/F). So I can find all of the other gauges straight from known sources, but since Mopar doesn't have an Oil Temp gauge in their calatog, I'm curious what specific Oil Temp sensors/gauges people recommend. Also, does anyone feel that my gut feel for what gauges I would like to see is wrong?
 

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A/F wideband is like $400.

to use a regualr air fuel you will need to wiring harness and extra 02 sensor from modern performance.

oil pressure is a good thing to watch. and so is air fuel. i have volt as my other gauge because at one point i was putting my stereo system back in my car :stab: but not anymore
 

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my thoughts

Hmmm, air to fuel ratio, oil pressure and fuel pressure. That's what I would go with, especially if you have stage 2 or 3.
 

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What about an exhaust temp gauge??? I heard a lot of people that like to run those instead of the air/fuel gauge. I had an air fuel on my Talon and it just looked cool with the constantly bouncing needle, but other than that it wasn't much of a help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So I take it that everyone is suggesting the primary gauges that are offered by Mopar. I'll agree that you can get quite a bit of information from the EGT, however I've heard nothing about oil temperature. Coolant temperature is interesting and good for the optimistic case, however since oil is transported through most of the engine it could in more important cases yield an important bit of information. I would think this would be incredibly important for engines where the stock has been replaced with one that doesn't have a water jacket and is only cooled by oil. With a narrow-band that is bouncing like so many others have mentioned, I would think that you would have to keep a careful eye on it in order to obtain useful information. On my brother's old rally'd celica it was nice to have a great deal of information that you could glance at the gauge during the instrument part of the periphery sweep. I'm not so sure about the benefits of fuel pressure, but then again this is my first turbo car, and the old celica had a carburator. If someone could explain the benefits of the gauges recommended I'd appreciate it.

If I could find a three pod replacement for the place where the current boost gauge is, I could easily fill all slots without worry, but with only three additional pods in the pillar, I'm still stuck with this rather painful decision.
 

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I have always liked fuel pressure, oil pressure, AF ratio.

Fuel Presuure - If you have a FI car or a car with nitrous it is good to know that your fuel pressure it good. Because if you loose fuel pressure while spraying or WOT boom boom goes the engine.

Oil Pressure - I have always liked because no oil = no running engine.

AF - Once again if you have a FI car or a car with nitrous you NEED to know your AF ration.

Other gauges like exhuats temp, coolant temp, etc etc is for thoe people who want to look cool and have 1273401723 gauges in there car. Stick to what you need.
 

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Very good indication of how you are running based on your exhaust temps... The A/F ratio gauge is immediate however it tends to bounce around alot so it can also be hard to tell exactly how you are running. Using the two of them together may actually be a better way to do it. That being said maybe it would be better to go with an EGT, A/F Ratio, and oil pressure. The first two will help you keep track of your fuel pressure so to speak, so you will not have to worry about that one. Read the following:

EXHAUST GAS TEMPERATURE GAUGES
-by MatT3T4

Many swear by these gauges because they get an “absolute” reading of temperature. On the positive side, EGT gauges are not subject to the non-linearities of an A/F meter. If you can repeat the same scenario, you should get comparative readings. So, for instance, if you note the EGT reading after doing a full throttle run from 3000 rpm to red line at 10 psi, then do the same thing at 12 psi, you should be able to see the difference on an EGT gauge. The same can be said for altering your fuel mix, installing a bigger intercooler, and maybe even changing your timing (retarding timing results in higher exhaust temps). Further, there are known parameters out there for exhaust temperatures. Some race engines run between 900 and 954 Celsius (1650-1750F). An ’89 fuel-injected pro SCCA car was happiest at 773 Celsius (1425F). Because of the wide range of “best” exhaust temperatures, anyone who assumes his or her engine is happy based solely on the number appearing on an EGT gauge is taking a risk.

This brings us to the “down side” of EGT gauges. The temperature reading is influenced by the location of the probe: usually on the manifold, but sometimes aft of the turbos or even further aft than that. A second problem is the response speed of the unit. A race car, running “full out” on a track, has plenty of time to develop a stable exhaust temperature. Running on the street, most of us can’t tell whether the gauge is registering the real temperature, or if it was just on its way up there when we had to let off the gas to keep from ramming the nice person in the SUV who pulled out in front of us. For street use, you have to get used to what the EGT gauge is doing, and be aware of differences when you change something on your car. A third area of concern is that the EGT gauge (like the A/F meter) will tell you when something has changed, but neither will tell you exactly what it might be.

Example: After an autocross run, the “peak-hold” feature on an EGT gauge showed it was only reading about 775 Celsius. Normally on the street it would read about 825C after spirited driving. The water temperature gauge showed that the car had heated up by almost 10 degrees (F) during the run, so it is likely that the EGT gauge did not have time to come up to temperature. In this example, if you leaned the A/F mixture based solely on what the EGT gauge was showing, you would have been taking a risk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I appreciate everyones input. I suppose learning to watch a constantly moving gauge wouldn't be too bad as the A-pillar is already right on the edge of the eye so it should be simple to see. So now a good question would be what specific make/model gauges do people swear by, or does everyone just end up using the Mopar faced Autometer gauges?
 

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AEM UEGO and Autometer Pyrometer (EGT) gauges are what I use, and I swear by them. GREAT indicators of how the car is running.
 
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