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What do you guys recommend for light scratches? I've never been one for detailing my car, but this is my first new car so Im going to try and treat it with much love.

I have Zymol wax..... I have yet to apply a coat..... but Im working on it.
 

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first things first

SporkLover said:
What do you guys recommend for light scratches? I've never been one for detailing my car, but this is my first new car so Im going to try and treat it with much love.

I have Zymol wax..... I have yet to apply a coat..... but Im working on it.
http://www.popularmechanics.com/automotive/sub_care_sat/1998/9/car_detailing/index.phtml here is a sight that is pretty informative i also sugest that you use fine grade steelwool on the windows to clean the road grime(ONLY ON THE OUTSIDE IT WONT SCRATCH THEM) but dont dip it in the same bucket that you use for your wash bucket also i suggest you get a good wash mit 100 percent wool not that polyester crap WAX is WAX is WAX you get what you pay for cheap wax lasts a week or two i use zymol it is good stuff all of zymol products are good, mothers car care products are also good stuff, bleach white on the tires to get them clean, for the glistening tires BLACK MAGIC TIRE WET apply it with a spounge it also smells good so it can be used on the interior but use a different spounge to apply it to your interior, small tooth burshes are also good for getting off wax around the door handles bottom of the wing and other little cracks, to get off water spots you can use 50/50 water/vinegar mix (AFTER YOU WASH THE CAR WITH SOAP AND WATER, WASH AND RINSE ONE PANEL AT A TIME WITH THE 50/50 WATER/VINEGER MIX YOU HAVE TO WAX IT AFTERWARDS BECAUSE THIS WILL STRIP THE WAX OFFand for the swirl marks i hate to say it it will probaly need to be buffed out but dont do it yourself unless you are experienced with a buffer BECAUSE YOU MIGHT BURN YOUR PAINT
 

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lilazndemon20 said:
3m perfect it finish
Second that, 3M perfectit II or III line. They make an awesome polish to get rid of swirls. We live by 3M and Wizard's Shinemaster products here :thumbsup:
 

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SporkLover said:
What do you guys recommend for light scratches? I've never been one for detailing my car, but this is my first new car so Im going to try and treat it with much love.

I have Zymol wax..... I have yet to apply a coat..... but Im working on it.
How to use ScratchX by hand to remove defects like these,
  1. Scratches
  2. Swirls
  3. Bird Dropping Etchings
  4. Water spots
  5. Scuff and Mars

+
+
= Success!

A couple of important notes to consider,

1) Clear coats are harder than traditional paints. This means they are more difficult to remove defects out of, especially by hand. This is part explains the increase in popularity of the Porter Cable Dual Action Polisher.

2) ScratchX is not a wipe-on, wipe-off product, (WOWO), it's more of a wipe on, work in product, (WOWI). You need to apply with a clean foam applicator pad and work the product in with a little passion.




Here is how to remove a bird dropping etching or an isolated scratch.
  1. Only work a small area at a time - about 6 inch by 6 inch area or smaller
  2. You can apply using a combination of circular motions and straight-line motions
  3. Work the product against the finish until it looks as you have almost run out of product.
  4. Re-apply the product and repeat the above steps 2-3 more times
When I apply ScratchX like I have listed above, I am able to get out about 95% of a bird dropping etching or isolated random scratches.

The trick is to work the product in until it just begins to disappear and to apply more than one application. You see, the ScratchX, like all Meguiar's Paint Cleaners, contain a diminishing abrasive, as you work ScratchX in, the microscopic diminishing abrasives gently abrade the surface removing small particles of paint. But as you work it in, these diminishing abrasives breakdown. Thus, they quit abrading the finish and actually polish the finish to a clear, high gloss. This diminishing action turned polishing action is a benefit to you because it enable you to work out defects without leaving scratches behind.

Because the diminishing abrasive breakdown, you need to re-apply and repeat the process until the defects are removed.

Note: You can rarely remove a bird dropping etching, or a scratch, from a clear-coated finish with one application.

"A little technique goes a long way"

ScratchX works, if you work it. It takes a little practice to get the hang of removing defects out of modern clear coats with hi-tech products like ScratchX. It' not like the old days with a traditional lacquer or enamel paint job where you could apply some old-fashioned rubbing compound and in a few passes, the scratch would be gone, (and so would a lot of your paint).

High gloss clear coats are thin delicate surface coatings that are easily dulled and easily scratched. Once they are dulled down and/or scratched, it takes the right product, the right technique together with the human element of care and passion to massage them back to a glistening gemstone.

Have patience, and if at first you don't succeed, try try again.

Mike Phillips
Technical Specialist
1-800-854-8073 ext. 189
[email protected]


:clap: [/size]
 

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Zymol is more of a polish than a wax. The Zymol will last about a week unless you layer a good carnuba on top of it.

I suggest a three stage at least twice a year(maybe once depending on the person...I personally do it 4 times a year) I suggest maguires ... you can spend the money on Zanio but its expensive and A LOT of work and you can make it look just as good.

Maguiers polish, polish, and then NXT wax. Let the NXT cure for 24 hours and hit it with another coat of NXT. Follow up a week or 2 later with anotehr coat of NXT and a layer of carnuba. If you use a little dual action orbital polisher make sure you ONLY use microfiber bonnets.
 

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A variable speed buffer will get you the best results, but as stated before, if you aren't experienced with them, DON'T try to teach yourself. Not only will you burn paint, you'll burn moldings and edgings as well. If you know someone to teach you, please please PLEASE take the extra 10 minutes to tape off any areas with molding on them, I.e. around the sunroof, and the top and bottom of windows. I detailed at BMW, and more often than not guys wouldn't do this step and accidentally burn a molding....not good.

If you do use a buffer, get some cleaner wax first, then use polishing wax, if its only light scratches you won't need to compound the car. When you use a buffer, wet the pad and wring it out, the wax doesn't dry as fast that way, and overdried wax is a bitch. On top of that get spray wax, because as the area is getting freed of the wax it will get drier, keep it a bit moist, and the spray wax helps take off the wax in the process. A quick note: if the panel's hot your buffing too much/too hard in one area. Don't put pressure on a buffer, help it guide itself.

If you want to do it by hand, make sure you have, and do, a few things first. I always claybar my car before waxing it, it doesn't take that much extra time, and there is more often than not dirt stuck in the paint between waxing time. When your ready to wax, because your car is so new you won't really need a cleaner wax, and applying cleaner by hand isn't always successful. (Remember, your not going to get the best results this way, you wont remove everything unless you have a buffer). When you apply the wax, and I STRESS this because a ton of people don't realize it....APPLY THE WAX WITH THE BODY LINE OF THE CAR! Never "wax on wax off" always use lines, your only putting yourself on the market for more swirl marks if you use a circular motion.

Use an applicator pad to put it on in lines, let it cure, and then use a microfilament towel to wipe it off. Take a detailing brush (or a small flat paint brush) and get inside the edges where the wax is stuck. Don't scrub with it, just BRUSH, if you scrub too hard you WILL scratch the clearcoat.

Good luck with whichever way you choose to do it, I recommend using a buffer, because you get the best results fastest that way, especially with liquid wax (pour a line on, catch it and buff). But thats me. Don't go out and waste over 200 dollars on a buffer if your not gonna learn how to use it first. They can be tricky when you first start. If you have any scratches that are really deep that even a buffer wont get out, wetsanding and then using a variable speed is your only option. I'm not even gonna say how to wetsand, because if done wrong, the whole finish in that area is ruined.

Sorry that was so long, but I kinda like detailing....

-Crystalmarie

P.S. I've never personally been a fan of Scratch-X, Some scratches are just too deep for it.

P.S.S. NEVER use rubbing compound!!! You may as well apply sandpaper to your car and rub! It will ruin paint.
 

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i have to say scratch x is awesome,.. believe it or not its even taken scratches out of my WINDSHIELD

I tried it only because i was upset i was going to need a new windshield and figured it couldnt hurt.. what had happened was a rock was stuck in my wiper blade, so when the rain cleared and the wipers brushed against the dry glass i got several very noticable scratches right in front of the drivers seat.. the scratch x removed those scratches perfectly.. I SWEAR!

it has also taken scratches out of my carbon fiber hood!

the stuff is amazing!
 

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SexySRTChick said:
A variable speed buffer will get you the best results, but as stated before, if you aren't experienced with them, DON'T try to teach yourself. Not only will you burn paint, you'll burn moldings and edgings as well. If you know someone to teach you, please please PLEASE take the extra 10 minutes to tape off any areas with molding on them, I.e. around the sunroof, and the top and bottom of windows. I detailed at BMW, and more often than not guys wouldn't do this step and accidentally burn a molding....not good.

If you do use a buffer, get some cleaner wax first, then use polishing wax, if its only light scratches you won't need to compound the car. When you use a buffer, wet the pad and wring it out, the wax doesn't dry as fast that way, and overdried wax is a bitch. On top of that get spray wax, because as the area is getting freed of the wax it will get drier, keep it a bit moist, and the spray wax helps take off the wax in the process. A quick note: if the panel's hot your buffing too much/too hard in one area. Don't put pressure on a buffer, help it guide itself.

If you want to do it by hand, make sure you have, and do, a few things first. I always claybar my car before waxing it, it doesn't take that much extra time, and there is more often than not dirt stuck in the paint between waxing time. When your ready to wax, because your car is so new you won't really need a cleaner wax, and applying cleaner by hand isn't always successful. (Remember, your not going to get the best results this way, you wont remove everything unless you have a buffer). When you apply the wax, and I STRESS this because a ton of people don't realize it....APPLY THE WAX WITH THE BODY LINE OF THE CAR! Never "wax on wax off" always use lines, your only putting yourself on the market for more swirl marks if you use a circular motion.

Use an applicator pad to put it on in lines, let it cure, and then use a microfilament towel to wipe it off. Take a detailing brush (or a small flat paint brush) and get inside the edges where the wax is stuck. Don't scrub with it, just BRUSH, if you scrub too hard you WILL scratch the clearcoat.

Good luck with whichever way you choose to do it, I recommend using a buffer, because you get the best results fastest that way, especially with liquid wax (pour a line on, catch it and buff). But thats me. Don't go out and waste over 200 dollars on a buffer if your not gonna learn how to use it first. They can be tricky when you first start. If you have any scratches that are really deep that even a buffer wont get out, wetsanding and then using a variable speed is your only option. I'm not even gonna say how to wetsand, because if done wrong, the whole finish in that area is ruined.

Sorry that was so long, but I kinda like detailing....

-Crystalmarie

P.S. I've never personally been a fan of Scratch-X, Some scratches are just too deep for it.

P.S.S. NEVER use rubbing compound!!! You may as well apply sandpaper to your car and rub! It will ruin paint.
same here i worked at a ford dealership they were picky like me
 

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SexySRTChick said:
A variable speed buffer will get you the best results, but as stated before, if you aren't experienced with them, DON'T try to teach yourself. Not only will you burn paint, you'll burn moldings and edgings as well. If you know someone to teach you, please please PLEASE take the extra 10 minutes to tape off any areas with molding on them, I.e. around the sunroof, and the top and bottom of windows. I detailed at BMW, and more often than not guys wouldn't do this step and accidentally burn a molding....not good.

If you do use a buffer, get some cleaner wax first, then use polishing wax, if its only light scratches you won't need to compound the car. When you use a buffer, wet the pad and wring it out, the wax doesn't dry as fast that way, and overdried wax is a bitch. On top of that get spray wax, because as the area is getting freed of the wax it will get drier, keep it a bit moist, and the spray wax helps take off the wax in the process. A quick note: if the panel's hot your buffing too much/too hard in one area. Don't put pressure on a buffer, help it guide itself.

If you want to do it by hand, make sure you have, and do, a few things first. I always claybar my car before waxing it, it doesn't take that much extra time, and there is more often than not dirt stuck in the paint between waxing time. When your ready to wax, because your car is so new you won't really need a cleaner wax, and applying cleaner by hand isn't always successful. (Remember, your not going to get the best results this way, you wont remove everything unless you have a buffer). When you apply the wax, and I STRESS this because a ton of people don't realize it....APPLY THE WAX WITH THE BODY LINE OF THE CAR! Never "wax on wax off" always use lines, your only putting yourself on the market for more swirl marks if you use a circular motion.

Use an applicator pad to put it on in lines, let it cure, and then use a microfilament towel to wipe it off. Take a detailing brush (or a small flat paint brush) and get inside the edges where the wax is stuck. Don't scrub with it, just BRUSH, if you scrub too hard you WILL scratch the clearcoat.

Good luck with whichever way you choose to do it, I recommend using a buffer, because you get the best results fastest that way, especially with liquid wax (pour a line on, catch it and buff). But thats me. Don't go out and waste over 200 dollars on a buffer if your not gonna learn how to use it first. They can be tricky when you first start. If you have any scratches that are really deep that even a buffer wont get out, wetsanding and then using a variable speed is your only option. I'm not even gonna say how to wetsand, because if done wrong, the whole finish in that area is ruined.

Sorry that was so long, but I kinda like detailing....

-Crystalmarie

P.S. I've never personally been a fan of Scratch-X, Some scratches are just too deep for it.

P.S.S. NEVER use rubbing compound!!! You may as well apply sandpaper to your car and rub! It will ruin paint.
:werd: good post.

I want to add, that the average weekend detailer can get REALLY far with a Porter Cable 7424 Dual Action/Random Orbital polisher. I bought one last year and it is one of the best investments I have ever made. The rotary polisher as discussed requires a lot of experience to use correctly, and carries a lot of risk to the paint finish until you do have that experience. The PC (as it's called) doesn't generate enough speed in any direction to cause any significant heat, and therefore won't burn your paint. In fact, in order to harm the paint finish, you really need to try to hurt the paint.
But, there are things that a rotary will do that a dual-action polisher cannot, including removal of deep scratches. Also, if you're the lucky owner of a white car with single-stage paint, you're better off using a rotary. You can work that white paint all day long with a PC and not do squat :)
 

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Wow a lot useless posts in this thread like "use this wax" or a how-to on washing your car.

Guys, slapping on a coat of wax will not remove light scratches. A wax is a protective barrier that is layered on top of a finish that has been properly prepped. There a very few that offer light swirl filling capabilities such as Meguiars NXT (which is awesome by the way).

You have to use a DEDICATED paint cleaner.

-Meguiars Scratch X
-Meguiars Swirl Remover
-3M Foam Polishing Pad Swirl Remover

These are some products that work very well depending on the severity of the scratches and how you use them.

The Scratch X is formulated to be used by hand. You have to work it in and it takes some elbow grease. Probably 3-4 coats depending on how severe the scratches are. But it works.

The 3M Swirl Remover is another great product that can be used by hand or machine. I don't own a Porter Cable dual-action polisher but I do own a few 6" random orbital polishers and the 3M worked well using it. The key is being able to work the product in the paint to shave that tiny layer of clear to get to a fresh surface and remove the defect.(see Meguiars illustration in my previous post above).

My advice is, if you don't have a buffer (which most people don't) try a product by hand. Like I said, it takes time and some elbow grease. Your not going to get rid of swirls just by applying a coat and rubbing it off.

If you want to spend the cash by what most crazy detail buffs buy, the Porter Cable G-100 polisher.
 

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At BMW we use strictly Meguiars products. Again I'm not a fan of scratch-x, but I do love the Swirl Remover. I also love their Diamond Cut Compound 2.0. Its not too abrasive, and when you've got a black or dark colored car, it works wonders.

I've never used a Porter Cable. I use a Dewalt Variable speed, and a Dewalt Orbital. I'm used to them from BMW, and OCDetailing and I love the great variations in speed/OPMs depending on what type of work your using it for (unlike the PC which doesnt have speeds nearly as high). I've heard the PC is lighter, and lot of people use it and love it, but never have personally.
 

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if it is the small surface scratches that you are talking about...which im sure it is then you dont need to buff them out or use scratch x....wash the car then apply meguiers #7...its a glaze apply it everywhere even in the door handle thats where you get alot of scratches...do that take it off with a 100% cotton towel...then apply wax i use collonite wax but you cant buy that in the store...take the wax off with a diaper that is the best thing to use...dont bother buffing your car it is to new to do that and once you buff it once you cant just not buff it again.....
 

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Mike4089 said:
if it is the small surface scratches that you are talking about...which im sure it is then you dont need to buff them out or use scratch x....wash the car then apply meguiers #7...its a glaze apply it everywhere even in the door handle thats where you get alot of scratches...do that take it off with a 100% cotton towel...then apply wax i use collonite wax but you cant buy that in the store...take the wax off with a diaper that is the best thing to use...dont bother buffing your car it is to new to do that and once you buff it once you cant just not buff it again.....
I'm not trying to sound mean but what the hell are you talking about?

You can not apply a glaze and expect it to make all the swirls/scratches dissapear. A glaze is nothing but oils and solvents meant to improve surface gloss. Kind of like a lotion for paint. This is what you use AFTER you have properly prepped the surface with a dedicated paint cleaner (like Scratch X).

And what's with the diaper? :lol: Are you stuck in the 1960's? Step into today and you will find that the best thing to use on paint is Microfiber. This material will NOT scratch your surface. Buy Microfiber towels to dry your car, to apply quik detail spray or to remove waxes and polishes. Its better than cotton towels or any other material out there.
 

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Well, there are two ways of dealing with light surface marring, like cobwebs and swirls...
Filling/obscuring them and abrading the surrounding paint down to the level of the imperfecton (polishing).
You CAN cover them up with something like NXT, 3M SMR and other waxes/polishes with filling characteristics, or you can polish them out. One is permanent, the other is not. It all depends on how bad the marring is, what kind of product you have at your disposal, and whether you are using a machine or doing it by hand. Other things to consider are how much time you have to put into it, and whether you care about the car or not (prepping for a used car lot? Fill em!).
I say to each their own. Personally, I polish them out. In a few years when I run out of clearcoat (lol) I'll get a new paint job :lol:
 
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