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Logic, learning and doing things correctly. Three things that are frowned upon in this community. By all means recommend a kit that is a fire hazard. I simply pointed out why said kit is a bad idea.
 

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Gizmodo you should start building a fuel pump rewire then and locate it near the alternator? Kinnettic said it would be more money and more complicated to build it near the alternator. I mean he has sold over 250 kits.. So I am sure you could make good money since they are only $30 or so in parts.

I ran a $15 ebay kit and it was horrible. The big gauge wire to the small gauge wire started to get hot and my car wouldn't start. Reverted back to stock and car ran great. I saw his kit and being plug and play looked nice. I don't drive my car in rain so I don't have to worry about it getting wet.

Haha brings back memories of guys wrapping their relay in a ziplock bag to protect it from the elements during the winter
 

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I ran one for about a year until the relay (solid state btw) died and left me stranded. I don't know why I did it really, never had an issue with the factory wire and still don't to this day...
It's not a solid state relay, just a regular relay in a skirted package to seal with the connector, and a tab on it to hang it up.
 

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It's not a solid state relay, just a regular relay in a skirted package to seal with the connector, and a tab on it to hang it up.
Not talking about your kit but an old vendors, many years ago... I actually have your kit (both single and dual pump) sitting in my basement :)
 

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Gizmodo you should start building a fuel pump rewire then and locate it near the alternator? Kinnettic said it would be more money and more complicated to build it near the alternator. I mean he has sold over 250 kits.. So I am sure you could make good money since they are only $30 or so in parts.

I ran a $15 ebay kit and it was horrible. The big gauge wire to the small gauge wire started to get hot and my car wouldn't start. Reverted back to stock and car ran great. I saw his kit and being plug and play looked nice. I don't drive my car in rain so I don't have to worry about it getting wet.

Haha brings back memories of guys wrapping their relay in a ziplock bag to protect it from the elements during the winter
It is no more complicated, it is still just a power and ground wire. The location of the fuse and relay doesn't change that.

I don't get power from the alternator, I connect both power and ground directly to the battery. The ground and power wires go inside the cabin, down the driver's side, across the rear seat and then out through the parking brake grommet. As for why I won't make a kit, time is money. The parts may be $30 but there is time involved in creating said kit and the potential profit is not worth my time. I've posted both a parts list and pictures of how to do it in the past. As they say, you can lead a horse to the water but you can't make them drink from it.
 

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A fuel pump rewire is essential if you turn up the fuel pressure or upgrade the pump. The factory wiring is 18 gauge and, after routing through the car to the pump and then back through the car to the trunk for the ground, is ~20' long. A Walbro 255 at 58 PSI (stock) draws ~9 amps and flows about 61 gallons per hour at 13.5 volts. If you drop 1.5 volts (about 11%), you drop down to 51 gallons per hour. This may be fine for your setup, but isn't ideal.



An 18 gauge wire can handle 9 amps for about 4' before it starts dropping more than 2% of the voltage. Ideally for the 15' run from the factory fuse box to the pump at 9 amps, you'd want a minimum of 12 gauge wire to keep the voltage (and fuel flow) up. This also goes for the ground run to the trunk which is about 10'.



If you jump up to 70 psi, the fuel flow drops to 58 (13.5 volts) and 48 (12 volts) while also increasing the current draw to 10 amps. Now if your wiring isn't upgraded, you'll drop even more voltage and lose even more fuel flow, which can cause lean conditions/premature pump failure.

As for the location of the fuse, 4-5 years ago when we first came out with our kit, we polled both options and an overwhelming majority wanted it all back by the tank with the relay. There is an unprotected section of wire, but after selling over 500 of them over the years, there hasn't been a single incident. The section of battery cable between the battery and the starter is also unprotected, a short in that will cause a fire. Routing is critical. Since our rewire is designed to have the power lead run along the fuel/brake lines, that is a well protected area already and should cause no problems except with improper installation. If anybody prefers the fuse to be by the alternator, we can definitely make that happen.

They've been extremely trouble free kits and have also caused an alarmingly amount of cars run better just from sending enough power to the pump. Especially at WOT when the fuel demands increase greatly and proper voltage to the pump is critical.

FWIW, in the PT Cruiser, the power wire and ground to the fuel pump is 16 gauge. So Chrysler felt it necessary to increase the power/ground circuit of the NA PT Cruiser but kept the SRT-4 wires at 18 gauge like they were from 1995-2002 in the 2.0 SOHC cars. So they are definitely missed the bar on that one.
 

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Gizmodo you should start building a fuel pump rewire then and locate it near the alternator? Kinnettic said it would be more money and more complicated to build it near the alternator. I mean he has sold over 250 kits.. So I am sure you could make good money since they are only $30 or so in parts.

I ran a $15 ebay kit and it was horrible. The big gauge wire to the small gauge wire started to get hot and my car wouldn't start. Reverted back to stock and car ran great. I saw his kit and being plug and play looked nice. I don't drive my car in rain so I don't have to worry about it getting wet.

Haha brings back memories of guys wrapping their relay in a ziplock bag to protect it from the elements during the winter
It wouldn't be any more difficult to build with it near the alternator, it was just a preference of the overwhelming majority to keep the fuse in the back by the relay so that's what we went with. It would be a task to redraw the harness in our software and build a new set of directions, but then once it's setup it wouldn't be more difficult. Safely mounting the fuse somewhere for everybody with the exhaust, axle, and belts in the engine bay would result in more complicated installation and more user related failures when running it from the alt stud along the brake lines/fuel line back to the pump is a simple task.
 

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Ease of install is not more important than properly protecting the circuit. To each their own though. The overwhelming majority doesn't have any preferences, they simply don't know any better as evidenced by a claimed sale number of over 250. Even one preventable fire is too many.
 

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Ease of install is not more important than properly protecting the circuit. To each their own though. The overwhelming majority doesn't have any preferences, they simply don't know any better as evidenced by a claimed sale number of over 250. Even one preventable fire is too many.
There are different forms of protection, even with putting the fuse in the engine bay you would have the section of wire from the alternator to the fuse as "unprotected". It's physically protected under the car along with the brake/fuel lines. 250 was conservative, we've done over 400 of the single pump rewires, over 100 dual pump rewires, and half a dozen triple pump rewires. We came out with them September 2015 and haven't had a single fire from them so the results speak for themselves.

Obviously it's "more ideal" to route it like you did, and put everything up by the battery but all of our kits have the advantage of being stupid easy to install. Whether it's the fuel pump rewires, wot box harnesses, boost box harnesses, etc. All mega simple to install, but when I make custom harnesses I route all the wiring for that inside the harness.

I had made up a nice post yesterday with pics/charts explaining why a fuel pump rewire is necessary in the first place but it said it needed admin approval and I have no idea where it went.

Basically a Walbro 255 needs 9 amps to put out 58 psi, even 9 amps is too much for the stock 18 gauge wiring, and with too much current you lose voltage. Losing 1.5 volts along the wire drops fuel flow by about 10 gallons per hour. You'd be fine on some setups, but anything with real fuel demands can't handle that and you will run leaner from improper wiring. Bump up to a 450 or 044 or anything else, the problem gets worse. Even the NA PT Cruiser had 16 gauge wire to the pump, so the factory wiring is too small, rewires are essential in almost every build that demands more fuel than stock. Just because your setup has been "fine without one" doesn't mean it's ideal. Need to do a voltage drop test at full power to see how bad the wiring is hurting your setup.
 

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I have 2 inches of wire between the battery and fuse. You have what, 6-7 feet? As they say in the electrical world, the fuse protects the wire. If you're comfortable selling something that you built and you know has a flaw that could be corrected so be it. Your business, your livelihood.
 
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