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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Friend's srt-4 had a piston ring failure at about 400whp, running a t3 60-1. In the process of rebuilding, we would like to sleeve if possible, but do not know if they have been developed yet. If anyone can point us in the right direction, it would be appreciated. Thank you.
 

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threatcon13 said:
Friend's srt-4 had a piston ring failure at about 400whp, running a t3 60-1. In the process of rebuilding, we would like to sleeve if possible, but do not know if they have been developed yet. If anyone can point us in the right direction, it would be appreciated. Thank you.
developed? you make it sound like an idea never tried before.

just sleeve it

btw-what do you call a piston failure?
 

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dymondboy2f said:
btw-what do you call a piston failure?

When the Detroit Pistons are unsuccessful in retaining possession in???
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What do you mean by just do it? Im not too familiar w/ srt-4s, but I never heard of taking a block to a machine shop, saying "just sleeve it", and having the machine shop do it. If there are specific aftermarket sleeves available, then by all means, we will do it. If I am wrong and you can just have any machine shop make sleeves, then excuse my ignorance. The piston ring basically snapped on cylinders and 1 and 4, I'm pretty sure the pistons took damage as well, and the walls were scratched up pretty bad. Now I know it is possible to bore over a little bit and use forged internals, but my friend would prefer to have his block bored out to maybe a 2.5 and use sleeves. Thank you.
 

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just take it to a shop and get the engine custom done, or if the scratches aren't that deep bore it out to a 2.5 and it'd still have plenty of wall left to be strong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
dymondboy2f said:
just take it to a shop and get the engine custom done, or if the scratches aren't that deep bore it out to a 2.5 and it'd still have plenty of wall left to be strong.
ok, thank you for the info/quick reply. So are you saying that a machine shop could fabricate sleeves for the cylinder block, when you say get the engine custom done?
 

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RedSRT4Me said:
why do you want to sleeve a block that is iron to begin with? :readclose
that's what I was wondering, I thought you only sleeved aluminum blocks.
 

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srt4hokie said:
that's what I was wondering, I thought you only sleeved aluminum blocks.
Me three.

There is a lot of ricer misconceptions on the forums. Maybe they heard honda guys talking??
 

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if he wants to sleeve it to feel better, why make him think twice?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Pit Viper said:
This was an honest question. Not a "pick on the ricer" question.
Not everyone has had to deal with redoing an engine block.
that you viper and dymond, I didn't know that asking a simple question would lead up to people calling me a ricer. What's so rice about trying to find out all my options so my friend and I can do things the right way?
 

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The first thing I would do is have the shop sonic test the block to check the wall thickness. If there is enough material available in the cylinder walls the imperfections might be able to be dealt with with a simple overbore. Pay particular attention to the thickness on the thrust side of the block. The thrust side is the side that the piston "pushes" against during the cycle.
Sleeving is not a new art, and if done properly, the sleeved cylinder will be the strongest one in the block. I am not a fan of sleeving all the bores on a given block. In most cases the structual integrity of the block will be compromised, and this will just lead to more problems. As far as all the particular idiosyncrasies of sleeving a 2.4 block go, well, I'm a newbee, so I couldn't tell ya. :) The piston oiling feature of the block may need to be adressed if sleeves are added, but beyond that, I dunno. A GOOD machine shop should have a catalog of available sleeves listed by specifications like size and thickness, so if you chose this route there should be something available. A good manf. of sleeves is Darton Sleeves. Do a web search and you should come up w/ their website. Also make sure that the shop is experienced in the
sleeving procedure. Too many shops will tell ya "Sure, bring it in," but then use your block as a lab experiment.
Good luck!
 

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Just get some bigger bore pistons on bore the block with a torque plate. You can use a torque plate fron the turbo dodge 2.2 and 2.5 engines. This is common practice with the first gen neon guys with 2.4 swaps.
 

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Just an FYI Darrell cox tried sleeved blocks but found that the standard Stock block could handle GOBs of HP in the say umm over 1000 hp range.. I seriously doubt the walls are that scored.. I would recommend a machine shop bore it out and use oversized pistons.. Should be no problem at all. If you want to be really nit picky just make sure you use a machine shop that has a deck plate to bore the block so its true and straight. So a ring let go or do you know more about what the carnage was like?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
BigWoody said:
Just an FYI Darrell cox tried sleeved blocks but found that the standard Stock block could handle GOBs of HP in the say umm over 1000 hp range.. I seriously doubt the walls are that scored.. I would recommend a machine shop bore it out and use oversized pistons.. Should be no problem at all. If you want to be really nit picky just make sure you use a machine shop that has a deck plate to bore the block so its true and straight. So a ring let go or do you know more about what the carnage was like?
Thanks for the info woody. Yes, I'm sure that the blocks can theoretically handle that much horsepower, but its just my personal preference to sleeve blocks that will be seeing high boost; everyone has their own opinion on that matter, and I respect that. As a honda guy myself, I've seen many threads about how stock sleeves handled up to 500 whp w/ no problems, but ive seen many more threads with pictures of stock sleeves w/ huge cracks in them. I just went on darton sleeves, looks like we would have to custom order sleeves, which would be mucho $$$$$$. I guess I will call darton and a couple of machine shops tomorrow and ask what they think as well. Best to get a lot of advice from multiple sources. (another opinion of mine) I haven't really seen the aftermath of my friend's trip down the 1/4 mile, but it sounds basically like a piston ring failure, I just really dont want him to put in new overbored pistons and forged rods, and have him crack one of his stock sleeves, and have to do this all over again. I am not TOO knowledgable about forced induction, I am doing a lot of research though, and am piecing together my own turbo kit as we speak, so please forgive me if I said things that are wrong. Thanks for all your help guys.
 

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Since Im a little confused.. our 2.4 blocks are not sleeved from the factory.. Its a Cast Iron block.. boring .020 over will not hurt a thing. Also no need for Forged Rods as the stock rods in the SRT are plenty capable of High boost. The pistons are another matter hehe... Cox and them prolly are pushing 60 pounds of boost through their block along with some nitrous hehe.. The problem they have been seeing is at that high the bed plate cant seem to hold together with that high of cylinder pressure causing the bed plate to fail and the Crank to snap in halve from the stress. Im not trying to tell you which way to go but just a little info to help you better understand these motors. there is the simple and cheap way or the simple and right way and then there is the complicated and overdone way.. once you guys tear the motor down to look and see what it is then I would start a list of parts and see what the budget can afford. Good luck and keep us informed.
 
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