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Discussion Starter #1
Pros and cons of running a Coil pack heat shield?

I installed a DCR raised heat shield for the coil pack.

Looks great however it absorbs the heat from the turbocharger thus caused my coolant overflow tank to melt near the cap. Temps now seem to rise a bit more on engine temp readings. So I covered the hole of the overflow tank with a rag since the cap will not seat now that the tank is melted near the cap.

Also does it really block the ram air from the hood scoop? This feels like a counterintuitive design installing a heat shield.

Relocating the coil pack (longer spark plug wires) seems to be the best bet.
 

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I user heat wrap with a reflective coating around the coil pack and wires with zip ties to hold it. I also used washers under each bolt hole to raise it up from the valve cover and to promote a little air circulation underneath it.
 

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The job of the heat shield, as the name implies, is to prevent radiant heat making it to the coil pack. It is doing the job it is designed to. That doesn't mean there won't be negative consequences to it. $40-$50 for a piece of bent metal with a few holes in it has always seemed odd to me. Other than to make a quick buck I've always questioned the value of this particular part.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I agree the price was too much, however I wanted something to protect the coil pack.....then come to find out it was cheaper on Modern Performance.

Ive considered wrapping the shield with a reflective coating as mentioned by adecanmin.

But honestly I feel the best long term solution is relocating the coil pack.

Anyone agree its blocking the ram air from getting to the turbo manifold? It does seem to get hotter in that area now....plus as mentioned my overflow tank melted near the cap only which is very close to the coil pack heat shield.

Wonder if titanium would have been a better investment.
 

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I guess I'll make my statement this way. What makes you think you need to protect the coil?
this has always sort of been my thought on it too. I've never had a coil heat shield, however i have always had something covering the hot parts of the turbo (factory heat shields, AGP heat shield, turbo blanket...)

I've only replaced the coil once, and that was by choice, not because it stopped working properly. the hood vents should keep enough cool air blowing back there to do enough. (thats my opinion)


As for your overflow tank, there are several aftermarket ones you could install to replace the melting one.
 

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I think this is one of those tribal knowledge things that seems like a good idea but isn't.
MPx has genuine MOPAR coil packshttps://www.modernperformance.com/product/9605_Dodge_Neon_OEM_Mopar_Coilpack/03-05-neon-srt-4-ignition-and-electrical-ignition

Better idea is to use plenty of dielectric grease with good quality plug wires and regular spark plug changes.
My car has been fine with the original coil pack, MOPAR plug wires and Champion RE14MCC5 (copper) plugs gapped at .045" replaced every 2 years of 15K miles.
 

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there is a magic term "curie temperature" where a a magnetic material has a LARGE change in properties.. usually around 1000 F for laminated steel

if you take an un-heat shield big turbo and point a laser temp probe it easily will exceed curie

given the coil is just a few inches away i run a shield

i made my own .. of course.. thin spacer (1/8") cement board (the stuff you put over a plywood floor before tiling) its an amazing thermal insulator and i had it laying around.. and bent an L shaped piece of aluminium
sequence: valve cover, aluminum L, thermal spacer
 

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Since the S3 install I choose to delete the stock turbo-fold heat shields for a quicker turbo cool down.

I bent 1/16 aluminum for the shield and placed a washer under each corner of the coil (between the coil and shield).

The spark plug wires seem protected and the small size of the shield should allow a good amount of hood scoop air. The coolant reservoir is still looking good.

 

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to be fair....I've never used a heat coil shield in my life. Lived in Florida most of my life with the car.....had a big turbo forever. Never once lost a coil due to heat..

Tid bit....when automotive parts are designed the common temperature range of operation for most any component is between -40c to 80c (just common automotive design criteria in every customers spec). We test them there after prototyping them and they must have a 100% pass rate in design validation

Your heat shields are likely just aesthetic in their function at keeping your coil alive (unless you were dumb and removed all the factory heat shields that serve to moderate temperatures).....the design work to let them live at high temps was done before you opened the box

BTW someone mentioned curie temperature....the temperature of the coil will never see 1000F lol. Lol the plastic injection molding temperature of the plastic on the coil is done near 500F lol.....so 1000F would literally turn your coil into liquid since it's in liquid form during production at 500F. Just because your turbo is at 1000F doesn't mean your coil is anywhere near that....air is a great insulator and radiant heat doesnt transfer through air like that
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Since the S3 install I choose to delete the stock turbo-fold heat shields for a quicker turbo cool down.

I bent 1/16 aluminum for the shield and placed a washer under each corner of the coil (between the coil and shield).

The spark plug wires seem protected and the small size of the shield should allow a good amount of hood scoop air. The coolant reservoir is still looking good.

I like this design however the material still obsorbs the heat from the turbocharger/manifold.

I actually want to modify my DCR unique similar to yours.

Now to answer the question...when purchasing this SRT4, it did not come with a heat shield on the manifold so this is why I wanted to protect the coil pack.

When I get home I leave the hood open so it can cool down better on windy days. (No direct sun)

So it seems my options are now

A: Modify the unit to match the above unit (smaller and allows hood scoop air to travel towards the firewall area...maybe add some heat block/reflective material to the coil shield)
B: Run without a coil pack shield (remember the manifold does not have the stock shields)
or
C: just run some washers on the coil pack (Raise it away from the hot valve cover)

Anyone experiment with removing the black trim on the hood scoop help with increased air flow? I have not tried removing it yet.
 

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i did the hood scoop mod. It definitely brings some air in there. Be careful when cutting it. That plastic can get a little brittle due to age and heat. Without the heat shields your cowl may start to melt and or course your catch bottle is at risk.
 

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...BTW someone mentioned curie temperature....the temperature of the coil will never see 1000F lol. Lol the plastic injection molding temperature of the plastic on the coil is done near 500F lol.....so 1000F would literally turn your coil into liquid since it's in liquid form during production at 500F. Just because your turbo is at 1000F doesn't mean your coil is anywhere near that....air is a great insulator and radiant heat doesnt transfer through air like that
I was thinking the same thing. All the plastic in the area would be a puddle.
 

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Early on there were images (on the forum) of heat damage to the SP wires, that is what started the coil heat shield mod (in my opinion). Having something between the radiating heat of the turbo and the wires just seemed to make sense. (I also trimmed the hood scoop insert inner walls to free up some additional air flow)

When big wheels were installed in the TD05 cartridge the S3 turbine oil slinger grooves were heavily coked from heat soak and poor oil (rotella syn), so I removed the upper and lower turbo heat shields for a quicker cool down and since ran only German/Belguim Castrol (group 5 syn). Years later the TD06SL2r 11 blade turbine was pulled for a higher flowing 9 blade version. The oil slinger grooves were quite clean...I thing the heat shield delete and improved oil helped.

The coil heat shield is shaped/trimmed to allow good air flow from the hood scoop to the turbo.

When parking in my garage the hood is popped for decent airflow, and easy driving is done the last minute before a shut down.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have since removed the coil heat shield and am running washers for now. Got a good link for the hood scoop mod?
 

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