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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I currently have 500 miles on my 05'. After 300 miles I got on it. THe first few days I was seeing normal 14 psi, but after a week, I'm only getting 12-12.5 psi. Is this normal for some SRT's to only see 12-13 after break in?
 

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Normal, it all depends where in the power band you get on it. Before 3000rpm should give you full boost, after 3000rpm, sometimes will give you 2psi less. Something somilar to what you are seeing.

Percy
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
pdieppa said:
Normal, it all depends where in the power band you get on it. Before 3000rpm should give you full boost, after 3000rpm, sometimes will give you 2psi less. Something somilar to what you are seeing.

Percy
thanks, i know what you're saying, but is 12-12.5 psi full boost on some SRT's? instead of 14?
 

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Timkim said:
thanks, i know what you're saying, but is 12-12.5 psi full boost on some SRT's? instead of 14?
To put it simply, the SRT's computer adjusts boost depending on the weather... The max you should see stock is around 16psi spike falling to 15psi in HOT conditions, COLD conditions you'll see around 12 (depending on how cold it is). The ECU makes sure you're always making the same HP, colder air would yield more hp, so it pulls boost. Never the less check over your hoses and make sure the clamps are tight... you could have a boost leak.

HOTROD MAGAZINE
The turbo 2.4L is the first boosted engine to use DaimlerChrysler's Next Generation Controller. As the SAE paper describes, "The NGC algorithms are 'model-based,' continuously calculating the appropriate control parameters to keep the engine at its desired performance. This is a departure from past control strategies that relied on pre-programmed tables of operating conditions. The system is speed density rather than mass air.
Interestingly, the wastegate control is dictated by throttle demand rather than a simple blowoff at a set boost pressure. This way, the computer can estimate the power needs of the driver and either provide boost pressure or not. The good news is that you may get more boost in some conditions than a basic mechanical blowoff might provide; the bad news is that the computer "can also reduce the torque as required to ensure powertrain durability," . The system uses an air charge temp (ACT) sensor after the intercooler as well as a throttle inlet pressure (TIP) sensor. The combined information can predict turbo compressor speed and pressure drop across the throttle blades and the IAC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
SRT-4_&_NeonACR said:
To put it simply, the SRT's computer adjusts boost depending on the weather... The max you should see stock is around 16psi spike falling to 15psi in HOT conditions, COLD conditions you'll see around 12 (depending on how cold it is). The ECU makes sure you're always making the same HP, colder air would yield more hp, so it pulls boost. Never the less check over your hoses and make sure the clamps are tight... you could have a boost leak.
Thanks alot. That explains so much. Its been cold here lately 50-60 degrees, and I was thinking it should be boosting more in cooler weather but its the other way around.
 

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Is there a way to get around this or is the PCM always going to be controlling your boost? If you have a WGA set to like 17psi in hot wether, does this mean when is cold the PCM will drop it a few psi's? Thanks
 

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if your running stock vacuum lines on a WGA, yea u will see a drop. But, if you have it wired up properly, then no, u will not see a drop.
 
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